More Regulation in the EU – A good or A Bad Thing?

Posted Wednesday, November 23, 2016 by
Skerdian Meta • 1 min read

The European Commission is requesting tighter capital requirements for second level banks which operate in the EU. They include a 3% binding leverage, higher capital ratio for short term loans, which is similar to higher leverage requirements, a lower financial lever which obviously means lower leverage and more powers for the watchdogs, and other regulating initiatives to hold out bank payments which don't have a capital cushion big enough to support them in case of a drawdown.

I see Euro sceptics (strangely form the UK) are the first to oppose such proposals with all sorts of argument, all of them don´t make much sense. Some are saying that Europe doesn´t need any more regulation, while others are saying that it is too late.  

First of all, the loopholes in the financial regulation were the reason for the 2008 global financial crisis. Those who oppose stronger regulation are still living a decade in the past. This is a global trend which is supposed to avoid future crises.

Second, it's never too late to sort out the crap. Europe needs to be more integrated between member countries and the legislation is the base where everything starts from. If the European project is to survive and be successful, then the only answer is a federal EU. While the UK is pulling out, the EU is tightening the ranks.

People tend to try harder and make things work when there is an imminent threat on the doorstep and that's what the EU is doing right now. Hopefully, there will be no nasty surprises in the general election in a number of EU countries next year, which might ruin everything.

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About the author

Skerdian Meta is our Lead Analyst
Skerdian Meta Lead Analyst. Skerdian is a professional Forex trader and a market analyst. He has been actively engaged in market analysis for the past 11 years. Before becoming our head analyst, Skerdian served as a trader and market analyst in Saxo Bank's local branch, Aksioner. Skerdian specialized in experimenting with developing models and hands-on trading. Skerdian has a masters degree in finance and investment.
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